Directory

Jeffrey L Kavanaugh

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Position
Associate Professor
Office
CCIS 3-009
Phone
780-492-1740
Email
Web Site
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Publications

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  • Kavanaugh, J.L., Moore, P.L., Dow, C.F. and Sanders, S.W.  In Press.  Using pressure pulse seismology to examine basal criticality and the influence of sticky spots on glacial flow. Journal of Geophysical Research - Earth Surface.
  • Sanders, J.W., Cuffey, K.M., MacGregor, K.R., Kavanaugh, J.L. and Dow, C.F.  In Press.  Dynamics of an alpine cirque glacier.  American Journal of Science.
  • Kavanaugh, J.L. and Moore, P.L.  2010.  A peak-capturing measurement circuit for detecting and recording short-duration glacial signals.  Journal of Glaciology, 56(195): 41-47.
  • Kavanaugh, J.L., Cuffey, K.M., Morse, D.L., Bliss, A.K. and Aciego, S.M.  2009.  Dynamics and mass balance of Taylor Glacier, Antarctica: 3. State of mass balance.  Journal of Geophysical Research - Earth Surface, 114, F04012, doi: 10, 1029/2009JF001331.
  • Kavanaugh, J.L. and Cuffey, K.M.  2009.  Dynamics and mass balance of Taylor Glacier, Antarctica:  2. Force balance and longitudinal coupling.  Journal of Geophysical Research - Earth Surface, 114, F04011, doi: 10.1029/2009JF001329.
  • Kavanaugh, J.L., Cuffey, K.M., Morse, D.L., Conway, H. and Rignot, E.  2009.  Dyanamics and mass balance of Taylor Glacier, Antarctica:  1. Geometry and surface velocities.  Journal of Geophysical Research - Earth Surface, 114, F04010, doi: 10.1029/2009JF001309.
  • Kavanaugh, J.L.  2009.  Exploring glacier dynamics with subglacial water pressure pulses: Evidence for self-organized criticality?  Journal of Geophysical Research-Earth Surface, 114, F01021, doi: 10.1029/2008JF001036.
  • Aciego, S.M., Cuffey, K.M.. Kavanaugh, J.L., Morse, D.L. and Severinghaus, J.P.  2007.  Pleistocene ice and paleo-strain rates at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica.  Quaternary Research, 68, 303-313.
  • Holt, J.W., Peters, M.E., Morse, D.L., Blankenship, D.D., Lindzey, L.E., Kavanaugh, J.L. and Cuffey, K.M.  2006.  Identifying and characterizing subsurface echoes in airborne sounding data from a high-clutter environment in Taylor Valley, Antarctica.  Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar, June 19-22, 2006, Columbus, Ohio.  1-5.
  • Kavanaugh, J.L. and Clarke, G.K.C.  2006.  Discrimination of the flow law for subglacial sediment using in situ measurements and an interpretation model.  Journal of Geophysical Research - Earth Surface, 111, F01002, doi: 10.1029/2005JF000346.
  • Kavanaugh, J.L. and Cuffey, K.M.  2003.  Space and time variation of  818O and 8D in Antarctic precipitation revisited.  Global Biogeochemical Cycles.  17(1), 1017, dio:10.1029/2002GB001910.
  • Kavanaugh, J.L. and Cuffey, K.M.  2002.  Generalized view of source-region effects of 8D and deuterium excess of ice-sheet precipitation.  Annals of Glaciology  35: 111-117.
  • Kavanaugh, J.L. and Clarke, G.K.C.  2001.  Abrupt glacier motion and reorganization of basal shear stress following the establishment of a connected drainage system.  Journal of Glaciology, 47(158): 472-480.
  • Kavanaugh, J.L. and Clark, G.K.C.  2000.  Evidence for extreme pressure pulses in the subglacial water system.  Journal of Glaciology, 46(153): 206-212.

 

 

Research area

Glacier Dynamics, Mechanics of Unconsolidated Materials, Subglacial and Groundwater Hydrology, Permafrost and Periglacial Landscapes, Environmental Change, Glacier Response to Changing Climate, Ice Core Paleoclimatology

Research interest

Through my research, I seek to improve our understanding of glacial systems: how they flow and respond to forcings, how they interact with climate and sea level, how they archive past climates, and how they shape the landscape. My current research is focused on how mechanical conditions at the glacier bed are controlled by hydraulic conditions in the subglacial water system. Because the flow and stability characteristics of ice masses are strongly influenced by conditions at the base of the ice, this question is central to the understanding of many interesting aspects of glacier behavior, such as fast flow exhibited by surging glaciers and ice streams. Furthermore, a realistic representation of basal processes is necessary to improve the accuracy of ice sheet models. I use a variety of techniques to investigate the interactions between hydrological and mechanical conditions at the glacier bed, ranging from developing and installing novel subglacial instruments to developing and analyzing numerical models.

Research opportunity

I am currently looking for graduate students for the following projects:

  • Investigating basal processes and ice dynamics of cirque glaciers
School

University of British Columbia in 2001