Express News: archive

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Surprising spread of volcanic ash key to solving Earth's mysteries

Britta Jensen is a researcher who has discovered volcanic ash from an eruption in the west about 1,200 years ago traveled much farther than expected, drifting across Greenland and into Europe.

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New exhibit reveals dinosaur discoveries

Discovering Dinosaurs tells the tale of Alberta's prehistoric past through the latest research by world-leading paleontologists. People can see more than 250 jaw-dropping specimens in one location—most of which have never before been publicly exhibited.

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UAlberta ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

Vice-Provosts and student Vice-Presidents from the University of Alberta took part in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge on September 12.

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Six UAlberta faculty members named to Royal Society

In recognition of their outstanding scholarly, scientific and artistic achievements, six University of Alberta faculty members have been elected as fellows of the Royal Society of Canada.

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Distinguished University Professor

In recognition of his outstanding record of scholarly research, teaching and service, the University of Alberta has appointed Dr. Brian Jones as a Distinguished University Professor.

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Science prof looks to past climate change to understand future impact

A former University of Alberta PhD student has come back to campus as an assistant professor, to explore and teach about the mysteries of natural climate warming and ice age history, on the heels of a newly published paper in Nature.

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Ancient rocks yield clues about Earth's earliest crust

The University of Alberta geochemistry student spent the better part of three years collecting and studying ancient rock samples from the Acasta Gneiss Complex in the Northwest Territories, part of his PhD research to understand the environment in which they formed.

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John Allan: The Founding of Alberta's Energy Industries

Willem Langenberg, Adjunct Professor, EAS and Dave Cruden, Professor Emeritus, EAS invite you to a book launch of their most recent publication.

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Dr. Jiri Krupicka (1913 - 2014)

Dr. Jirí (George) Krupicka of Edmonton passed away on Thursday, April 24, 2014, just 11 days before his 101st birthday. He was Professor Emeritus of the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and his career at the University of Alberta ran from 1968 to his retirement in 1988. His geological research specialized in metamorphic petrology with emphasis on the Canadian Shield and the Western Cordillera of North America.

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Museums Celebration Highlights Deep Talent Pool

Andrew Locock has been a longtime advocate for the University of Alberta Museums. He served as the Collections Manager for the Mineralogy/Petrology, Meteorite, Drill Core, Invertebrate Paleontology, and Trace Fossil collections for more than seven years.
UofA Hall of Fame (2014 Inductees)

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Municipal amalgamations often cost: expert

Dr. Sandeep Agrawal, head of the University of Alberta planning department said that municipal almagamation often ends up raising costs.

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Geosciences Alumni Reception

Departments of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences and Physics would like to invite all UAlberta Alumni, graduating Geology and Geophysics students, graduate students, industry affiliates and guests to our Annual Geosciences Alumni Reception.

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Scientist explores worlds past and present

J.P. Zonneveld doesn't shy away from the muck at Willapa Bay, Wash. during a group expedition to sample modern mudflats to understand how animals rework sediment in intertidal successions. Zonneveld says field work is one of the most enjoyable aspects of his work as a professor of earth sciences.

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Special theme in honour of the career of Professor John England in "Quaternary Science Reviews"

During the summer of 2012 John England conducted his last official arctic field season on southwest Banks Island, bringing to a close 47 years of field research in the Canadian Arctic.

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Canadian researcher studies catastrophic “supervolcanos”

While mankind has experienced some massive deadly volcanic eruptions in our recorded history, Vesuvius, Krakatoa, Mt St Helen’s, and Pinatubo just to name a few, we’ve never experienced the devastation of a supervolcano.

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Secret sea

A rare mineral encased in diamond confirms a mass of water the size of all the oceans combined could be hidden deep in the Earth's mantle.
Listen & read more at nature podcast.

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Hydrous mantle transition zone indicated by ringwoodite included within diamond

25 years ago scientists began to predict that such high-pressure olivines might contain vast amounts of water, locked deep in the Earth, but such a notion has remained highly controversial, with many scientists maintaining that the deep Earth is a desert in terms of water.

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Yellowstone supervolcano a local threat

Scientists have discovered Yellowstone National Park supervolcano is two-and-a-half times larger than previously thought, and it could erupt with 2,000 times the force of Mount St. Helens — a blast that would devastate North America and dump upwards of 10 cm of ash on Edmonton.

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Ancient Arctic mystery solved

What did a woolly rhino do for food? New study has ‘profound’ answers. Forbs, flowering plants, were the food of choice for woolly mammoths, woolly rhinos, horses and bison until the last glacial maximum, new research shows.

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Mastering science of the slide crucial to success of every winter Olympian

Dr. Lozowksi speaks for a long succession of researchers who have pondered and probed the science of slide and its role in winter athletics.

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World-leading lab opens new frontiers in diamond research

A University of Alberta researcher will continue to open up new frontiers in diamond research in Canada's Arctic with one of the largest and best-equipped labs in the world.

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New Canada Research Chairs for UAlberta

Dr. Long Li, will use his CRC to continue to develop tools to measure extremely low levels of carbon and nitrogen in minerals to address scientific questions in very broad areas, such as looking at the evolution of Earth systems and exploring energy and resources.

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Middle Cross of the Hungarian Order of Merit

Dr. Jozsef Tóth, Professor Emeritus, was recently granted the Middle Cross of the Hungarian Order of Merit by the Head of State (President of the Hungarian Republic) in Budapest, Hungary.

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University of Alberta Student Wins Prestigious Award

Kayla Stan has received Pi Beta Phi® Fraternity for Women’s prestigious Amy Burnham Onken (ABO) Award for Outstanding Scholarship and Campus and Community Leadership. Kayla brought out the academic best in others by spending countless hours encouraging and guiding those around her.

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The new evolution of dinosaurs

UAlberta research is challenging basic assumptions about dinosaurs—and greatly expanding the number of known species.

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Meteorite exhibit lands in Edmonton

When the Sky Falls, an exhibit hosted at the Enterprise Square Galleries, features over a dozen meteorite specimens, including five from the meteor that streaked over Chelyabinsk, Russia earlier this year.

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When the Sky Falls - Meteorite Exhibition

The University of Alberta Museums explores this topic in When the Sky Falls, a limited-engagement exhibition of meteorites and associated artifacts, July 30 – August 3 at the Enterprise Square Galleries (10230 Jasper Ave, Edmonton). Hours: Tuesday-Friday 12-6pm, Saturday 12-4pm.

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Yukon gold mine yields ancient horse fossil

When University of Alberta researcher Duane Froese found an unusually large horse fossil in the Yukon permafrost, he knew it was important. Now, in a new study published in the journal Nature, this fossil is rewriting the story of equine evolution as the ancient horse has its genome sequenced.

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And Speaking of the Future: Geo Fingerprinting

"Society doesn't always value scientific research, but you need that knowledge to tap into-using theoretical insights, you can solve huge engineering problems."

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Always at the Forefront of Research and Innovation

"EAS is focused on monitoring and reducing the environmental impact of resource development through processes like carbon capture and storage, and most recently through attention to the planning issues associated with resource development."

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The Science of Leadership: Ken Lueers, CEO of ConocoPhilips Canada

It’s a story with a happy ending. With the support of his wife and parents, Lueers followed his heart and graduated from the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Science with a geology degree, landed his first job with Texaco, and the rest is history.

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Honours grad fords stream between water science and policy

"I was looking for a summer job on campus and got one in the hydrology lab in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences."

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MeltDown: Is our planet in Crisis?

The U of A’s own Dr. Ian Stirling and expert glaciologist Dr. Martin Sharp will be joined by award-winning filmmaker James Balog to share what they’ve learned at a free public presentation and forum on June 12.

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Regeneration of Little Ice Age bryophytes emerging from a polar glacier with implications of totipotency in extreme environments

Across the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, widespread ice retreat during the 20th century has sharply accelerated since 2004.

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Melting Glaciers Cause One-Third of Sea-Level Rise

The world's glaciers lost 260 gigatons of water each year between 2003 and 2009, making these rivers of ice responsible for almost a third of sea-level rise in that time, new research finds. Martin Sharp and former EAS graduate students Alex Gardner and Anthony Arendt are co-authors on the paper.

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Billion-year-old underground oasis

A reservoir of water at ~2.4 kilometers below the surface in the Canadian Shield turned out to be the oldest free water ever found so far. Dr. Long Li, is part of the team made this discovery.

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Bioavailability of zinc in marine systems through time

Two geomicrobiologists in our department are part of a research team that successfully challenged a long-accepted theory about the chemical composition of the ancient oceans.

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Professor Emeritus Dr. Jiri Krupicka celebrates his 100th birthday!

Congratulations to Professor Emeritus Dr. Krupicka on his 100th birthday!

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The spacingTime Continuum – Inaugural Whyte Ave Edition

There's just something inexplicably cool (to me) about seeing a photo of a horse drawn carriage filled with a moustachioed brass band circa 1907 lounging outside of the building where you drink your coffee and check your emails each morning.

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New: Whitecourt Meteorite Crater Exhibit

The revised Whitecourt Meteorite Crater exhibit is now on display in the Mineralogy and Petrology Museum, ESB B-08, and features a scale model of the impact crater and the largest known meteorite from Whitecourt.

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EAS Impressions

This month, we are pleased to present an interview with Eilidh Richards, who published the results of her undergraduate thesis in the international science journal, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. Her supervisor was Dr. Lindsey Leighton, and it is worth noting that publishing undergraduate research is an unusual accomplishment.

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The top 12 research stories of 2012

Here are the stories of our researchers and their results that ranked highest among the most-read UAlberta News headlines of 2012.

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The Changing Face of the North

The North is melting. But as the world’s northernmost research university, the U of A is at the forefront of understanding these changes — from polar bears to glaciers.

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A scholar and a steward of the North

It was 1965 when U of A professor emeritus John England first set boots down on the tundra of Canada’s far north. He says the opportunity changed his life.

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Edmonton researcher's meteorite study shines a light on the red planet

A University of Alberta researcher is unlocking some of the secrets of Mars by studying a meteorite that plummeted into the Moroccan desert 15 months ago after making a 225-million-kilometre journey from the red planet.

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Middleton Medal awarded to Dr. Brian Jones

Brian Jones was recently awarded the Middleton Medal for Sedimentology by the Canadian Sedimentology Research Group.

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Royal Society of Canada honours U of A standouts

“This award is a grateful reminder of the enormous opportunity that I have been given to cross the entire Canadian Arctic Archipelago—bay by bay, fiord by fiord—exploring so many profoundly beautiful places while sharing this experience with close friends and colleagues,” said England.

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Centennial Web Site

Our Centennial website displays early photographs, a chronology of events, selected biographies, group photographs and more. Please enjoy browsing through the historical materials from our archives.

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Photographs from the early years of the Department of Geology

This exhibition of photographs is on display at the Royal Alberta Museum for the month of September, 2012. It provides an impression of the personnel and activities in the early years of the department.

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Meteorite holds clue to life's left-handedness

A University of Alberta researcher says a meteorite that came down in British Columbia 12 years ago now reveals that a key molecular component present in all life on Earth may not have originated on this planet.