Calendar Events

Date / PlaceTimeEvent Title
Fri Oct 31, 2014
Place: Tory 3-36
12:00
Abstract: Boundary|Time|Surface: Art meets geology in Gros Morne National Park, NL Artists construct installations in natural landscapes following several different traditions. The North American tradition of Land Art, exemplified by the work of Robert Smithson and James Turrell, includes major permanent interventions in the landscape. In contrast, European practice of Environmental Art, including the work of Andy Goldsworthy and Richard Long, has favoured less intrusive, more ephemeral site-specific installations constructed of materials from the local environment, combining elements of both sculpture and performance art, recorded in photographs and videography. These two methods of working within the landscape reflect different perspectives on the relationship between humans and the natural world, and on the permanence of human actions imposed on the landscape. Earth Scientists are also responsible for interventions in the landscape, both physical and conceptual. The familiar periods of the geologic timescale - Cambrian, Ordovician, Silurian, etc. - were established by pioneers of geology in the 19th century at a time when they were believed to represent natural chapters in Earth history. As a result the boundaries between the periods, originally set at major unconformities and facies changes, were the sites of many controversies. The boundaries tended to become diachronous as ad hoc correlations, based on different criteria, were made from one country, and continent, to another. Since the mid-20th century, stratigraphers have attempted to resolve these inconsistencies by defining stratotypes: sections of continuously deposited strata where a single horizon is chosen as a boundary, to which other sections can be correlated. One such international stratotype, marking the Cambrian-Ordovician boundary, is defined at Green Point in Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland. With the support of Parks Canada and The Rooms (the provincial gallery of Newfoundland and Labrador), we gathered driftwood and rocks from the foreshore in the area of Green Point over a two-week period. Then, in the course of a single ebb tide, with the help of volunteers, we built an ephemeral fence of 52 vertical driftwood poles, 2-3 m tall, along the boundary horizon at Green Point, extending across a 150 m wave-cut platform from sea cliffs to the low-water mark, separating Ordovician from Cambrian strata. During the remainder of the tidal cycle, and the following days, we allowed the fence to be dismantled by the incoming flood tide. The cycle of construction and destruction was documented in video and with timelapse still photography. The work symbolizes the brevity of human experience relative to the enormity of time, and the fragility of the boundaries that humans impose on the natural world. Future exhibits in more traditional gallery settings are envisaged, which will involve three-dimensional translucent prints and video displays derived from the imagery captured.
Wed Nov 05, 2014
Place: Riverview Room, Shaw Conference Center
17:00
The second annual Planning for Prosperity event ticket sales have begun. The event is put on by local industry representatives in support of the program. Last year with more than 100 people in attendance, more than $6,000 was raised in support of the PJ Smith Scholarship. This year, funds raised will go towards the establishment of entrance scholarships for the program.
Fri Nov 07, 2014
Place: Tory 3-36
12:00
Fri Nov 14, 2014
Place: Tory 3-36
12:00
Fri Nov 21, 2014
Place: Tory 3-36
12:00
Fri Nov 28, 2014
Place: Tory 3-36
12:00
Fri Dec 05, 2014
Place: Tory 3-36
12:00
--